22nd March 2019
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Satchu's Rich Wrap-Up
 
 
Tuesday 15th of January 2019
 
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Mike @SecPompeo keeps a bible open at his desk to remind him of "God, and his word and the truth", he told an audience in Cairo on Friday
Law & Politics


The US secretary of state also appears to keep a darts board of Barack
Obama’s face in his office. That America’s chief diplomat would give a
speech in Egypt is unremarkable. That he would give one attacking the
last US president is less normal, though not unprecedented. That he
would start with a declaration of his evangelical faith is even less
typical, but still pardonable. To do all three at once — attacking
America’s last president in the Middle East in a speech to a Muslim
audience that was aimed at Christian radicals — is in a category of
one. It’s certainly not diplomacy.

Pompeo is a genuine, end-of-days, believer in the apocalypse. It’s a
cloud-parting eschatology he shares with Mike Pence, the
vice-president. “We will continue to fight these battles,” Pompeo told
a church congregation in Wichita three years ago. “It is a
never-ending struggle . . . until the rapture. Be a part of it. Be in
the fight.” Generally I believe a public figure’s beliefs should be
irrelevant to their job. Whether they’re atheist, Opus Dei, Buddhist
or Muslim, should have no bearing on our assessment of their fitness
for office. Yet I can’t help but feel anxious that both of Donald
Trump’s main global envoys, Pompeo and Pence, have a conflict between
their private beliefs and what they publicly claim to be doing.

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05-DEC-2016:: "We have a deviate, Tomahawk."
Law & Politics


The specialist is monitoring data on his mission console when a voice
breaks in, “a voice that carried with it a strange and unspecifiable
poignancy”.
He checks in with his flight-dynamics and conceptual- paradigm
officers at Colorado Command:
“We have a deviate, Tomahawk.”
“We copy. There’s a voice.”
“We have gross oscillation here.”
“There’s some interference. I have gone redundant but I’m not sure
it’s helping.”
“We are clearing an outframe to locate source.”
“Thank you, Colorado.”
“It is probably just selective noise. You are negative red on the
step-function quad.”
“It was a voice,” I told them.
“We have just received an affirm on selective noise... We will
correct, Tomahawk. In the meantime, advise you to stay redundant.”
The voice, in contrast to Colorado’s metallic pidgin, is a melange of
repartee, laughter, and song, with a “quality of purest, sweetest
sadness”.

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05-DEC-2016:: I have no doubt that Putin ran a seriously 21st predominantly digital programme of interference which amplified the Trump candidacy
Law & Politics


POTUS Trump was an ideal candidate for this kind of support. Trump is
a linguistic warfare specialist. Look at the names he gave his
opponents: Crooked Hillary, Lyin’ Ted, Little Marco, ‘Low-energy’ Jeb
— were devastating and terminal.

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"This is the deflagration of an epoch. It's the apocalypse of this information system, of the TVs, of the big newspapers, of the intellectuals, of the journalists." @Mov5Stelle's @beppe_grillo
Law & Politics


He is right, traditional media has been disrupted and the insurgents
can broadcast live and over the top. From feeding the hot-house
conspiracy frenzy on line (‘’a constant state of destabilised
perception’’), timely and judicious doses of Wikileaks leaks which
drained Hillary’s bona fides and her turn-out and motivated Trump’s,
what we have witnessed is something remarkable and noteworthy.

Putin has proven himself an information master, and his adversaries
are his information victims.

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Gabon President Ali Bongo left Rabat, Morocco on Monday evening where he was recovering from a October 24 stroke. @povonewstv
Law & Politics


@PresidentABO is expected back in Gabon's capital Libreville today,
just a week after the failed coup on January 7 @povonewstv

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More testimony coming today from Alex Cifuentes, the guy next to Chapo in this photo. He described himself as Chapo's "secretary, his right-hand man, and his left-hand man." @keegan_hamilton Thread
Law & Politics


Alex said he was flown into the mountains to meet with Chapo. When he
arrived at the clandestine landing strip, he was greeted by around 50
men in camo armed with rifles. They rode on ATVs to meet Chapo, who
told Alex, "the best thing was for us to start working."
Alex said Chapo had at least seven hideouts in the mountains around of
Culiacán. They were all similar: Simple huts with tinted windows, with
electricity powered by generators. They had plasma screen TVs,
refrigerators, washer-dryers, and other conveniences.
Alex said he was present when Chapo celebrated his birthday on April
4, 2008. He received several gifts, including a white armored pickup
truck from Damaso Lopez, a camouflage Hummer from his sons, plus an
ATV and watches. The armored vehicles cost around $150K each.
Alex said Christian would propose IT projects for the cartel and
"Chapo would assign whatever budget was needed" to complete it
quickly. Chapo spent "hundreds of thousands of dollars" on technology,
including spyware that he had installed on the phones of his people
close to him.
Alex said Chapo would use spyware to activate the mic on someone's
phone without them knowing. Also had the ability to "extract images
and files.… it was just like having a copy of the phone." Chapo put
the spyware on phones of his chief of security, his wife, and
mistresses.
The spyware would alert Chapo and his personal secretary about phone
calls. The secretary would listen for "anomalies" and report back to
Chapo.
Alex: "Joaquin was really interested in what people were talking about
him. If it was not pertaining to him, he didn't really care."
Alex also described how Chapo stopped the Mexican military from
eradicating opium poppies and marijuana in the mountains: "If it was a
small group of 25 men, he would send over an icebox with food and tell
them this was what there was, otherwise they would face bullets."

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Currency Markets at a Glance WSJ
World Currencies


Euro 1.1479
Dollar Index 95.565
Japan Yen 108.68
Swiss Franc 0.9810
Pound 1.2908
Aussie 0.7217
India Rupee 70.835
South Korea Won 1120.03
Brazil Real 3.6991
Egypt Pound 17.9085
South Africa Rand 13.7551

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Growth in gross domestic product for the region will probably accelerate to 3.5 percent this year from an estimated 2.8 percent in 2018, @MoodysInvSvc's said @business
Africa


“Moody’s expects government debt ratios to deteriorate only marginally
or stabilize in 2019, reflecting ongoing fiscal consolidation and the
positive impact of higher growth rates on the denominator of debt to
GDP,” the company said.
“Debt trajectories for a number  of sovereigns remain vulnerable to
lower-than-expected growth, exchange-rate depreciations and contingent
liability risk from weak state-owned enterprises.”

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Alrosa, the world's largest diamond company, has announced the launch of operations in Zimbabwe. @newswireZW
Africa


This was announced by Alrosa CEO Sergey Ivanov today during President
Mnangagwa’s visit to Moscow

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Zimbabweans Are Left Reeling as Cash-Starved Economy Implodes @economics
Africa


Chronic shortages of fuel and foreign exchange, surging inflation and
mass strikes have driven Zimbabwe to the brink of economic collapse
and made a mockery of President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s claim that the
country is open for business.
Many shops and factories have shut their doors because of a lack of
customers and those that continue to trade are open to haggling over
prices to secure hard currency. At an appliance shop in the capital,
Harare, a salesman whispers that a Whirlpool Corp. washing machine
priced at about $5,000 if paid for electronically will sell for $1,500
in cash, while at a nearby electrical warehouse, a $600 invoice is
whittled down to $145 for payment in dollar bills.
The Zimbabwe Congress of Trade Unions, which represents most labor
unions in the southern African nation, responded to the price increase
by calling a national strike that began Monday.
Chronic shortages of fuel and foreign exchange, surging inflation and
mass strikes have driven Zimbabwe to the brink of economic collapse
and made a mockery of President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s claim that the
country is open for business.
Many shops and factories have shut their doors because of a lack of
customers and those that continue to trade are open to haggling over
prices to secure hard currency. At an appliance shop in the capital,
Harare, a salesman whispers that a Whirlpool Corp. washing machine
priced at about $5,000 if paid for electronically will sell for $1,500
in cash, while at a nearby electrical warehouse, a $600 invoice is
whittled down to $145 for payment in dollar bills.
Motorists have formed snaking lines outside filling stations in the
hope of buying gasoline when and if supplies arrive, waiting for hours
or even days at a time.
On Sunday, the government raised the official price of gasoline to
$3.33 a liter, the world’s most expensive when compared to prices
quoted by GlobalPetrolPrices.com. The Zimbabwe Congress of Trade
Unions, which represents most labor unions in the southern African
nation, responded to the price increase by calling a national strike
that began Monday.
The last time things were this bad was in 2008, when the country was
contending with hyperinflation that saw prices doubling every day,
left shop shelves empty and forced people to buy groceries from
neighboring countries or on the black market. The following year, the
government abolished the Zimbabwean dollar in favor of the use of
other currencies, primarily the U.S. dollar.

Here’s what Zimbabweans have to deal with on a daily basis:

The official inflation rate stands at 31 percent, well short of 2008
levels but still high enough to drive consumers to the black market or
import their own food and other basics.
Goods paid for electronically cost as much as four-and-a-half times
more than if cash were used. Retailers have resorted to a dual-pricing
policy and offering cash discounts, defying the government’s threats
to act against them.
Supermarkets have stopped selling a number of goods and stock outages
of everything from bread to coffee are commonplace. Zimvine, a
Facebook group, is being used to request and share information on
where to find food, fuel and other goods and how to contact lawyers
specializing in immigration.
The head of Zimbabwe’s main industry body has warned that many
companies that continue operating will shut this month due to the
currency shortage.
The city authority in Harare has scaled back refuse removal and other
services because it can’t access diesel for its trucks.
Doctors staged a six-week strike to demand improved working conditions
and that their salaries be paid in cash. While the labor action was
called off on Jan. 10, it could take months to clear operation
backlogs.
Teachers and other state workers have warned that they’ll down tools
unless the government pays them in cash.

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Zimbabwean protesters burn tyres, block roads over fuel price hike @ReutersAfrica
Africa


Mnangagwa’s announcement of a 150 percent increase in fuel prices was
greeted with shock in Zimbabwe where unemployment is over 80 percent.
The government sets fuel prices via the Zimbabwe Energy Regulatory
Agency.
Residents of Epworth, 36 km (22 miles) south of the capital, protested
after the main labour federation called for a three-day strike
starting on Monday in response to the price increase.
“The main roads to town have been barricaded with rocks and there is
no public transport carrying people,” Phibeon Machona, a 27-year-old
Epworth resident told Reuters over the phone.
Police fired teargas to disperse youths protesting outside the high
court in Zimbabwe’s second city of Bulawayo, according to video
footage from the Centre For Innovation & Technology, a local news
service.
Riot police in trucks patrolled downtown Harare while some shops
remained closed.

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"Kabila is the real winner of all this," Kabemba said in a phone interview. "Even a decision to nullify the election will be in the interests of Kabila." @business
Africa


Unless Fayulu secures his preferred decision, it could be Kabila,
who’s ruled the cobalt- and copper-rich nation for almost 18 years,
who benefits from either of the other options available to the court,
according to analysts including Claude Kabemba, director of the
Johannesburg-based Southern Africa Resource Watch.
 If the vote is annulled, he’ll remain in office until a new election
is organized; should the court validate the result, the incoming
president has already signaled his willingness to work with his
predecessor.
“Kabila is the real winner of all this,” Kabemba said in a phone
interview. “Even a decision to nullify the election will be in the
interests of Kabila.”
If the court approves the official results, Tshisekedi will have an
opportunity to wield tremendous influence in Congo.
“The constitution makes the presidency the preponderant institution
and gives it enormous power,” according to Georges Kapiamba, president
of the Congolese Association for Access to Justice. “No decision is
taken by the government outside of the presidency.”
But while he’ll have a mandate to appoint senior judges, security
officials and state company bosses, he’ll be confronted by the
informal patronage networks that “riddled” Kabila’s administration,
said Jason Stearns, director of the Congo Research Group at New York
University.
“He will face significant push-back from these vested interests,” he
said. “The outcome of this power struggle is uncertain.”
Tshisekedi’s capacity to act independently will also be constrained by
the National Assembly, where Kabila’s ruling coalition won a crushing
majority in the concurrent parliamentary vote. Tshisekedi is obliged
to select his prime minister from the FCC’s ranks, while Kabila will
look to retain other key portfolios, according to Kabemba.
Fayulu has said he wants a recount for all three elections --
presidential, national and provincial parliament -- and told
supporters that results collected by his coalition’s own compilation
center show he won 61 percent of the vote.
The Constitutional Court began considering the challenge on Monday and
is expected to announce its ruling by the end of the week. It’s
unlikely the court will decide to accept Fayulu’s request, said
Stearns.
Four of the nine members of the court are known political allies of
President Kabila, while several others have been partial toward him in
the past,” he said. “They are likely to pass a verdict in Kabila’s
favor.”

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"Kinshasa is only slightly better connected to the global economy than the North Pole"
Africa


Matt Daniels notes that Kinshasa, with its 13 million residents, has
about 13 outbound flights each day.  That’s just slightly more than
Barrow, Alaska, which has 10 daily flights for its population of 5000
people.  Conversely, over 900 flights depart from Paris each day (pop.
13 million as well).

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@Airtel_Presence in talks on a potential takeover of @TelkomKenya - sources @Reuters
Africa


Bharti Airtel is in talks about a potential takeover of Telkom Kenya,
the East African nation’s smallest operator, three telecoms industry
sources told Reuters on Monday.
London-based Helios Investment, which owns a 60 percent stake in
Telkom, was looking to partly cash out of the investment which it
entered in 2015, the sources said.
Airtel and Telkom were not available for immediate comment.

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Branch International raises Sh500mn in latest commercial paper @CapitalFMKenya
Africa


Previously, the firm garnered more than Sh7.1 billion from top
international investors, including the World Bank Group’s
International Finance Corporation and Andreessen Horowitz, one of
Silicon Valley’s top venture capital firms, whose previous investments
have included Airbnb, Instagram, and Facebook.
In addition to the new capital, Branch is also announcing that it has
now issued its 10 millionth loan in Kenya since its launch in 2015.
Branch issues tens of thousands of loans per day and has disbursed
more than Sh25 billion in Kenya.

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by Aly Khan Satchu (www.rich.co.ke)
 
 
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January 2019
 
 
 
 
 
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